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Archive for November, 2015

Society’s Downfall

Anyone who knows me knows that I am obsessed with the TV show Scorpion. I like to talk about it, and could talk about it, the characters, and the plot for hours if given the chance (which I never am). Somehow the topic came up at dinner with my in-laws yesterday and my mother-in-law commented that it’s shows like that, that show geniuses in such a totally unrealistic way, that are basically leading to the downfall of society. According to her, shows like this cause people to think that all geniuses/academically-minded people are inept socially, not “normal”, whatever. My guess is she’s hinting that if people see academically-minded people in such a negative light, most people would not want to be educated. A mass of non-educated people in a democratic society will lead to its downfall. I agree that a section of our population sees education as a non-necessity. I don’t have the exact numbers, but I did read in a local paper a few years back that a huge majority of people in the area I grew up in believed that a college education was not necessary to getting ahead in life. People skills are seen as more important. This trend has been decades in the making, long before Scorpion or even The Big Bang Theory appeared on TV sets. I’m not here to debate that.

I’m writing to say that when one delves into the characters themselves, the geniuses of Scorpion are not portrayed negatively or unrealistically in my opinion. They are portrayed as human. Yes, they have extraordinary abilities and they think more logically than “normals” (this even my mother-in-law concedes), but I’d argue that their emotional well-being, or lack thereof, is because of the circumstances that they’ve grown up in and not because they are geniuses/academically-minded. I’d argue that if “normals” were put in the same circumstances, their emotional well-being would be influenced negatively too. Perhaps the “normals” would also have the same problems.

Take Walter’s life. He never had a good relationship with his father. His father didn’t understand him. He was bullied in school, including by his teachers (or at least one teacher as shown in one flashback episode). Thank goodness for his sister, but she’s currently dying. When he was 10 years old he met Cabe Gallo, a government agent. Throughout his pre-teen and early- to mid-teen years Cabe was like a father to him. He was someone Walter trusted. Cabe would have Walter work on projects for the government. Cabe understood that Walter wanted to do good things and needed something to keep his mind occupied, to keep learning new things. Then, Walter hears on the news that the software he created to drop aid packages was actually used to drop bombs, killing 2,000 innocent people. Trust was completely broken and Walter now has to live with that on his conscience. He hasn’t been able to sleep well for the past 16 years, having nightmares. Is it any wonder he has closed himself off to the world emotionally? Shunned by his parents, his peers. Opens himself up emotionally to someone who he thought would be like a father to him only to have his heart broken in a major way. What “normal” person could go through that in life and still come away unscathed?

Then there’s Happy.  First, her mother dies in childbirth. As someone who personally experienced losing a mother at a young age (3 years old), I can tell you, you never really get over the abandonment issues totally. Then when she was 3 years old her father got her a doll house. She wired it for electricity (she’s a mechanical genius). I’m sure she was very proud of herself. But, rather than being proud of his daughter and her abilities (or teaching his daughter the right way to do things if she did it wrong), her father ripped all her wiring out of the doll house. She rewired it. Her dad took away the doll house. Happy then became less talkative and more quiet. Is it any wonder why she can’t stand to be judged? As for a fear of getting close to someone that also probably goes back to her father putting her into foster care. Being moved from foster home to foster home, while always looking out the window to see if her dad is coming back, didn’t help her abandonment issues. Logically, there would be no point in getting close to someone when that person is just going to hurt you and leave. In these circumstances, what “normal” person would be fine emotionally?

I could say more about Sylvester and Toby, but essentially, they’re the way they are emotionally because of their experiences early in life too. Personally, I admire Sylvester. Despite his anxiety and fears, he has the courage to do what needs to be done to help those he loves and the greater good. Quite an inspiration for me.

Then there’s Ralph. A 10-year old genius, but someone who’s learning to come into his own living in a world of non-geniuses. Walter and the other geniuses teach him to understand his mind and his abilities, give him a safe place to realize his potential. But, at the same time, Ralph wants to know how to interact with is peers, how to make “normal” friends, be as “normal” as possible. And, with the support of Walter and Ralph’s mother, especially, but also Happy, Toby, Sylvester, and now Ray, he feels comfortable enough to do just that. What if Walter, Sylvester, Happy, and Toby had that type of support growing up?

What I’ve learned in my 45 years on this planet is that “normal” doesn’t exist. Everyone has some quirks. Sure, society dictates what is and what is not normal, and many know how to play the game of appearing normal in society, but most, if not all, have their obsessions, fears, opinions, points of view, ways of dealing with life that perhaps may seem out of the mainstream.

What if society would create a safe haven for those of all abilities and talents, without judgement and ridicule? I bet most of the troubles experienced in this world would disappear and we’d get closer to what God intended for our world and His children. As Pope Francis said in his address to Congress earlier this year:

Let us treat others with the same passion and compassion with which we want to be treated. Let us seek for others the same possibilities which we seek for ourselves. Let us help others to grow, as we would like to be helped ourselves. In a word, if we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities.

 

 

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